Discipleshift

DiscipleShift Book Review

I have read more books on discipleship and small groups ministry than I can remember. So, when I was recommended the book DiscipleShift by Jim Putman earlier this summer, I was somewhat hesitant to dive in. Much of what I have read over the past ten years concerning discipleship in contemporary Christianity is largely theoretical. Of course, there are obvious standouts in the discipleship literary landscape that have fundamentally shaped the way we as Christian leaders think about helping Christians mature. But, for every Exponential by Jon and Dave Ferguson (which offer abundant and paradigm-setting insights), there may be five to ten other works that provide not the how’s of discipleship, but the why’s and what’s. This information is useful to be sure, but perhaps not as helpful.

DiscipleShift belongs to the former category: a book published in April 2013 that I believe ought to be in the hands of every pastor and ministry leader – a book that will provide leadership insights into the importance of genuine Christian discipleship for years to come.

What causes this work to stand out among the rest is its absolute insistence on the fact that  the discipline of discipleship in a Christian community is not merely one avenue among many toward having a healthy, growing, ministry – it is the only avenue. If the Church isn’t making disciples, maturing followers of Jesus Christ, then it can’t rightly be called Church. The community of Christians exists for this one purpose: making disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, teaching them all that [Jesus] has commanded. DiscipleShift is honest about this mission and offers suggestions and tools for leaders to guide their communities into being shaped by that one goal.

“Attendance, busyness, construction, finances, and programs are not real indications of success. The core question of effectiveness the question that ultimately matters is whether the people who are getting saved are being conformed to the likeness of Christ. Are we making mature disciples of Jesus whoa re not only able to withstand the culture but are also making disciples of Jesus themselves.?” (p.19)

Far from being a book which makes discipleship sound good on paper only, Putman and his co-authors Bobby Harrington and Robert Coleman draw from years of experience and rigorous study to help form a picture of ministerial success that measures and values the same things Jesus did during His discipleship ministry.

“This model we advocate measures success by how many people are being loved and led into the way of Jesus, are coming to Christ and following Him. It measures how many people are being transformed into Christ’s likeness and are pursuing His kingdom mission. It values and measures how many are actually becoming disciples who can make disciples” (p. 29).

Rather than measuring the classic numbers of how many people, how many programs, and how much money, DiscipleShift calls leaders to dig deeper and measure not how many people showed up or raised their hands, but how many of the people who showed up got connected to a small group, or how many people in a small group are being mentored to lead, or how many leaders are mentoring others. It’s a model that teaches us to  focus on reproduction for the life of a believer; not just involvement, but fruit – the very things Jesus told His disciples were most important.

So if you’re struggling with not seeing the results from the ministry with which you’re involved, and if you’re looking for a resource that can help shape or re-shape the work God is asking you to do, or if you’re simply interested in finding out more about what the word “discipleship” means at all, pick up this book and apply it. I certainly intend to.